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The president, a servant of God?

August 10th, 2007 by isaac · 1 Comment

I was frightened and disturbed a few weeks ago when I read excerpts from a meeting president Bush had in Israel earlier. This is probably old news for most of the savvy folks out there who follow the blogs. Nonetheless, here’s the line that makes me worry:

According to Abbas, immediately thereafter Bush said: ‘God told me to strike at al Qaida and I struck them, and then he instructed me to strike at Saddam, which I did, and now I am determined to solve the problem in the Middle East. If you help me I will act, and if not, the elections will come and I will have to focus on them.’

You can read more of the minutes from that meeting here: Haaretz.com.

This reminds me of a song by Bright Eyes (i.e., Conor Oberst) entitled, “When the President Talks to God.” You can download it for free from iTunes; scroll down on the Bright Eyes ‘downloads’ page to find a link to the free iTunes download, compliments of Saddle Creek: Look here.

Tags: current events · music

1 response so far ↓

  • 1 isaac // Sep 1, 2007 at 11:07 am

    I’m preparing to preach tomorrow on a set of passages that have to do with pride and stumbled across a section in Augustine’s City of God that seemed quite appropriate for this post. Now, I’m not saying something silly like, “the president is the devil.” That’s just not true, given that our enemies can’t be flesh and blood, according to St. Paul (see this sermon on Ephesians 6). But there is a striking resonance between what Augustine names as the pride of grasping for divine power and what president Bush says about assuming God’s authority to kill people.

    Here’s the quote:

    “[the Devil] refused to be subject to his creator, and in his arrogance supposed that he wielded power as his own private possession and rejoiced in that power. And thus he was both deceived and deceiving, because no one can escape the power of the Omnipotent. He has refused to accept reality and in his arrogant pride presumes to counterfeit an unreality.He refused to be subject to his creator, and in his arrogance supposed that he wielded power as his own private possession and rejoiced in that power.” (City of God, book XI, chapter 13)